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Holy Whole Foods

by fancypants, December 30, 2010

I don’t shop at Whole Foods often, which is bad since they carry our Vuka product. But when I do make it in, it’s kind of like a fantasy world. I get swept up in the delights of exotic grains, and dream about how I’m going to feed my kids only gluten free goodies and wholewheat pizza. The reality is that close to $100 later, I’ve got some parsley, a jar of Bulgarian Yoghurt and a really expensive pastry to show for it. And that’s all for me. Jokes aside, I’d love to eat a more organic menu, but I don’t really know how to incorporate that, in an effective way, into our lives. Any ideas?

Comments

  1. Kirsten Wilson says:

    We belong to Grant Farms CSA, so cooking with organic
    ingredients is fairly easy (at least for most of the year). For 26
    weeks every year, we get a HUGE (and when I say huge, I mean HUGE)
    bin of locally-grown organic veggies and fruits every week. These
    are the exact same veggies and fruit sold to Whole Foods around
    Colorado (that’s actually a fact, not just an assumption). In
    addition, Grant Farms sells organically produced beef, chicken,
    pork and lamb. In the winter months, there is another veggie and
    fruit share option (mostly apples, pears, dry items like beans and
    flour, squash, cabbage, onions, etc) You can also choose to buy a
    weekly share of eggs, delicious bread or pastries all year long!
    Nearly everything we eat comes from Grant Farms. It’s all organic
    and grown about 10 miles away from my house. If you need more info,
    visit http://www.grantfarms.com or ask me because we have been members
    since the CSA started. Best decision ever!

  2. Door to Door Organics is a great way to get organic into
    your life. You get a box of organic fruits and veggies delivered
    weekly. You can either pick what they will send, or you can let
    them choose for you. I am a devoted and experienced WF’s shopper,
    and it is possible to shop there without spending a fortune. There
    are foods that I simply will not purchase if they are not organic,
    and local — and that would be meat and produce. I know that their
    meats come from local farms, have no hormones and their animals are
    raised in a clean, healthy & humane environment. Most of
    their produce is locally grown and organic. And there are
    definitely some fruits and vegetables that don’t have to be organic
    (like bananas or oranges — things with a thick rind or skin), but
    strawberries and the like really should be organic since the skin
    is permeable. I think investing in your health is a #1 priority.
    The grocery bill is a little bit higher, yes. But I think it’s
    worth it. It could be a coincidence, but my kids and I are rarely
    sick and I think what we eat has so much to do with that. I like
    your new blog, Lex! Best of luck to you! Teddi Bryant
    Hotmamas.wordpress.com

  3. baciamille says:

    Thank you ladies! We actually just started up our Door to Door Organics a few weeks ago. We had done it last year because the kids’ school gets a percentage of sales, however, I’m embarrassed to admit that I found it a huge hassle having to come into the school every Friday to get our box. I think that the delivery to our door is going to be much easier and I’ll let you know how it goes!